Category Archives: Berkshire Hathaway HomeServices PenFed Realty

BEWARE: Wire Fraud is on the Rise

In June 2017, cybercriminals stole more than $14 million from unsuspecting people. Real estate transactions are especially vulnerable to these wily larcenists.

Real estate purchases routinely involve sending large sums of money by wire. This method is convenient, fast, and generally secure. Still, sophisticated criminals have been able to exploit people’s lack of familiarity with the real estate and escrow process.

One of the most common scams has been to convince an unwary buyer that the instructions for wiring funds have changed at the last minute “for security reasons.” The email, which appears to come from the title company or other settlement service provider, asks the buyer to wire their funds to a different link than previously agreed. The unsuspecting buyer who falls for this deception will discover, too late, that their money has been diverted to the scammer’s offshore account and is gone forever, along with the scammer.

The obvious advice is to avoid getting taken in by this kind of chicanery. Never wire funds without personally verifying with the title company or real estate closing lawyer that any change is genuine. For those unfortunates who may fall prey to the scam, there are some immediate actions that may offer a slim chance to recover the misdirected funds.

  • Contact the bank or other financial institution the funds were sent from. They may be able to stop the transfer.
  • Contact all parties involved in the real estate transaction, including the title and escrow people, the seller and the agents.
  • Inform the FBI immediately. You can file a complaint at www.ic3.gov. This should be done as quickly as possible. Even waiting just 72 hours could be too late for any recovery.

There are few experiences in life that are more stressful, emotional and confusing as buying a home. Criminals are well aware of this and will do their utmost to leverage those aspects to separate unsuspecting people from their money.

Knowledge is key.

Source: Everyone’s favorite mortgage guy, Jason Banks and TBWS

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Buy ME, Build Equity, and Walk to the Metro!

You hear time and again how you can ‘own for less than rent’ and so often I hear tenants in apartments saying over and over that it is impossible to live in a 1-bedroom condo near a metro or in a walkable neighborhood.  Guess what!  We have a perfect case study in one of our new listings:

Hillwood Condominiums, Alexandria, VA
List price: $240,000
Annual Taxes $2,444
Annual Insurance (Estimated): $480
HOA Association Fee (Monthly): $205

With as little as 5% down you could own this condo and have a monthly payment as low as $1550 – the same price as your rent would be! Check out the below scenarios.

We especially love the 5-5 ARM program for its great rate and the fact you could be able to get 1.5% of the loan amount* paid towards your closing costs at settlement. Be sure to read the fine print at the bottom of this post for more on the closing cost promotion.

If you have some money saved up and you would like to make a larger upfront investment you can get your total monthly payment even lower than rent! Interested in learning more? Email me at Maxine (at) PenFedRealty.com and we will get in touch with you with the full scoop on this property and others that may meet your needs.

Either way, this is a great deal! Hillwood is located just across the street from the Trade Center with terrific shops, restaurants, and a spa. Then just a few blocks away you can grab a coffee at Starbucks, do your grocery shopping, drop the BMW off for service, or hop the Metro into the city.

The unit is right next to the community’s clubhouse and swimming pool. It has been newly updated with fresh paint, new floors, brand new appliances, Pella glass door, and more! Oh, and it has a terrific patio too!

In short, you can save money, build wealth, and help the environment by using the Metro instead of your car for the daily commute!

Check out the photos below or visit www.AHouseToSee.com for more information!

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Small Print: Rates Generated on: 10/9/2017. Payments are estimates. Actual Payments may be greater. See page 2 for additional Minimum/Maximum Payment information. APR= Annual Percentage Rate. ARM Rates may increase after consummation. *Terms of Monthly Repayment: 30 Yr Fx (with MI): 103 payments of $1,184 at 3.875% and 257 payments of $1,072 at 3.875% (4.385% APR) 5/5 ARM (with MI): 60 payments of $1,102 at 3.000% and 300 payments between $1,142 to $1,001 at 3.375% (3.716% APR) 15/15 ARM (with MI): 180 payments between $1,213 to $1,072 at 3.875% and 180 payments of $1,027 at 3.250% (4.270% APR) Rates as of: 10/6/2017 Program, rates, terms & conditions subject to change without prior notice. Pricing adjustments may be required based on down payment, credit and other factors. This is not an advertisement to extend consumer credit as defined by Reg Z 226.2. All loans subject to credit and property approval. Acutal rates my vary based upon factors like credit rating, down payment and the intended use of the property. 5/5 ARM adjust once every 5 yrs. after initial fixed 5 yr. term. Caps 2/2/5, Margin 2.0, and Index based on the 5 yr. Treasury. 95% LTV available for owner occupied purchase loans at or below $424,100 with MI. High Balance fixed available to $636,150 in certain areas – call MLO. Max LTV for condos in DC Metro area is 80%, 70% elsewhere. Loans over $750,000 require two appraisals. Down payment requirements may vary. Products displaying a rate of 9.99% are not available. For a limited time, PenFed will pay buyer closing costs* on the 5/5 ARM and 15/15 ARM when a BHHS PenFed Realtor and our preferred settlement provider is used.*Visit Mortgage Center at penfed.org for details.

We are #1 among repeat home sellers!

Berkshire Hathaway HomeServices – Ranked #1 by J.D. Power, again!

Did you see the news?  J.D. Powers ranked Berkshire Hathaway HomeServices #1 in overall satisfaction among repeat sellers! The study, now in its 10th year, measures customer satisfaction with the nation’s largest real estate companies.

“The Berkshire Hathaway brand is recognized and respected worldwide,” said Kevin Wiles, president and CEO of Berkshire Hathaway HomeServices PenFed Realty. “The fact that we’re #1 in satisfaction among repeat sellers is a testament to our dedication to consistently exceeding our clients’ expectations during every stage of the transaction.”

Among repeat sellers, the company also scored the highest when it came to satisfaction with their agent/salesperson, marketing, and the closing process.

 

Things to Consider When Buying a Townhome

If you’re buying a home but are not interested in keeping up with maintenance, you’re probably looking at buying a condo or townhouse. And while condos can feel very much like living in an apartment, a townhouse gives you a space of your own. While townhomes typically do share a wall with another home (or homes) in the development, buying a townhouse is also buying the little plot of land it sits on, which means getting an outdoor space you’re not likely to find in a condo.

You won’t find townhomes offering as much space as single family detached homes, but by offering more space than a typical condo they can have a lot of appeal for families—or anyone who needs more room than an apartment or condo, without the hassles of owning a single-family home.

But a townhouse isn’t the perfect solution for everyone. Let’s walk through what you should consider before deciding on a townhouse.

You’ll have to deal with a homeowner’s association

If you buy a single-family detached home, the repair and maintenance of it will be on you—but for townhomes, much of the repair and maintenance will be handled by an HOA. Though these services are not free, you’ll pay monthly dues in addition to your mortgage. An HOA will help you avoid unexpected costs (like the need to fix a damaged roof) and they’ll save you time on maintenance tasks by managing the yard and even shoveling the snow. Though this can increase your monthly expenses, it may also be a good way to make your monthly expenses more predictable, since surprise homeownership costs will be few and far between.

If low maintenance homeownership appeals to you, a townhouse could be an ideal fit. However, you should still take a close look at the HOA and what it offers you, because the precise repairs and maintenance they’ll do will vary from association to association.

Still, that association can come with snags if you want to customize your house. For example, you may not be allowed to change the exterior colors or plant whatever you’d like in your front yard. If that’s important to you, check the HOA’s rules (CC&Rs) to see what they allow. If they won’t let you use the property to your liking, you might consider a single family detached home instead.

You may be able to find a townhouse with better amenities

Though what you’ll find in your area will vary, because more townhomes can be built in a smaller space than single family homes, you’re more likely to find them in urban areas—possibly locations where it’s hard or prohibitively expensive to buy a single-family home. For this same reason, it can also be easier to find newly constructed townhomes, which can make it easier to find modern, updated amenities that you might not come by in an older single-family home.

In addition to these extras, buying a townhouse also means you’re buying into a community, and most such communities will also have shared amenities, like a gym, pool, tennis court, or laundry room. Different developments will offer different perks, so if there’s something in particular you have your heart set on, investigate the development to make sure it has just what you want.

It may cost less up-front

Because you’re sharing your home’s walls and foundation with your neighbors, construction costs for a townhouse are often lower than construction costs for a single-family home—which means you’ll pay less to buy one. Even considering the HOA fees (which you should carefully weigh against maintenance and repair costs if you’re trying to decide whether to buy a townhouse or a single-family home), you may be able to get more home for less money by buying a townhouse.

You’ll share a wall with a neighbor

However, there’s a downside to that lower cost—and it’s the fact that you share one or more walls with your neighbors and don’t have a lot of space to get some distance from your fellow community members. Because of this, townhomes can be nosier and offer less privacy than a detached home (though they’ll be quiet to those used to living in a condo or apartment).

In the end, how loud it is really comes down to your neighbors and your own tolerance for living in (relatively) close quarters.

Reprinted with permission from PenFed Credit Union Blog. ©2017. All rights reserved.

PenFed Foundaton Helps Veteran in Need

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PenFed Foundation and Humble Design Help a Veteran In Need

Humble Design and PenFed Foundation recently teamed up to furnish a home for a family in need. “No American—particularly one who has served in uniform—should have to go without a place to call home,” said PenFed Foundation President and CEO James Schenck. “There are plenty of organizations such as Humble Design that want to help, and PenFed Foundation is playing a key role by bringing them together to ensure more veterans are able to secure their finances and find safe places to live.”

Click the image above, or watch the video here:

Reprinted with permission from The PenFed Foundation. ©2017. All rights reserved.

Quick Tips for Easy Spring Cleaning

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The snow has melted, the days are longer, and all of a sudden everything seems in need of a nice freshening up.  If spring cleaning is on you mind but you are overwhelmed at the task ahead, check out these tips from MaxSold.com.

Decide what you are keeping

Heard of the KonMari decluttering method? Keep an item if it brings you joy and if you have room for it – if not, set it aside. Start with a post-its to speed up the process as you go along – bite the bullet and blaze through it in a day, or tackle one room at a time.

Don’t take it to the dump

One person’s trash is another person’s treasure – it’s amazing how much money you can recover for your unwanted things. Instead of filling up landfill, fill up your wallet. Barry Gordon, the founder of MaxSold, an online selling platform, says “A chair that the owner was going to leave out in the side of the curb sold for over $2000, and a box of extension cords that would have gone to the dump sold for $40.”

Don’t prematurely sell off high value items

Ever post an ad online and get a response in an instant? This will leave you wondering if you grossly underpriced the item. The opposite is also true – if no one responds to your ad for weeks, maybe you overpriced it, and lowering the price over days for 100s of items is inefficient. Use an auction platform like MaxSold to sell everything where multiple people compete for the goods. Things that are better will engage more people and foster competition for not only items in demand, but for everything you are clearing out.

Don’t put stuff in storage

So many people are focused on “What’s my dining room going to bring?” The hard truth is that no one is going to give you a lot of money for your dining room. It’s going to be heartbreaking. It’s going to be awful. If you’ve got someone to give it to in the family, then that’s a good idea. But most people do not. And since they have nowhere else to go with it, they decide to put it into storage. Unfortunately, they end up paying thousands of dollars in storage cost each year, only to have the items further depreciate in value.

10 Tips for Homebuyers and Sellers

Spring is here, and so is spring home-buying and -selling. Buyers and sellers preparing to take action this season should put those plans into play now—according to Zillow Group’s Report on Consumer Housing Trends, the No. 1 regret for both buyers and sellers is “not starting their home search or prepping their home to sell soon enough.”

“This spring, both buyers and sellers should be prepared for fast-moving sales, intense negotiations, and even bidding wars,” says Jeremy Wacksman, CMO at Zillow Group. “Home shoppers and sellers are motivated to become more strategic and knowledgeable about what’s happening in their neighborhood. Understanding whether you are in a buyer’s or a seller’s environment will help you manage your expectations and will give you insight into what you’re going to need to bring to the table in order to close the deal.”

For buyers, that means:

Keep your options open. More than half (52 percent) of homebuyers surveyed in the report said they also considered renting, and more than one-third (37 percent) of first-time buyers seriously considered continuing to rent. Savvy shoppers should have a Plan B in place, hoping to buy if it works out, but willing to sign a lease for a home if they don’t make a deal by the time they need to move.

Be realistic with your budget. Once you set it, stick to it. First-time home buyers are more likely to exceed their budget than repeat buyers (39 percent versus 26 percent), according to the report. Before you meet with a lender to determine how much mortgage you’ll be approved for, take a good look at your individual finances and spending preferences to determine the monthly payment range that you feel you can comfortably afford.

Get your financing squared away early. Plan to meet a few lenders four to six months ahead of when you’re planning to buy to ensure you can make a competitive offer quickly when you find your dream home. The majority (82 percent) of buyers get pre-approved, with 77 percent getting pre-approval from a lender before finding a home on which they are interested in placing an offer.

Find an agent with a winning track record. Take the time to find an agent who has expertise in fast negotiation, leveraging escalation clauses, and winning bidding wars. Only 46 percent of buyers got the first home on which they made an offer, according to the report, demonstrating that competition is now part of the process. Choose an agent based on sales and listing activity, area of expertise and reputation.

Communication is key. Make sure your preferred method—and frequency—of communication matches that of your agent. One-third (33 percent) of all buyers surveyed in the report preferred phone calls with their agent over emailing (21 percent) or texting (15 percent). Buyers can use the agent reviews on Zillow to learn more about prospective agents and their clients’ experiences.

And for sellers:

Start early and be strategic. Sellers consider putting their home on the market for five months before they list it—but the top seller regret is that they wished they spent more time prepping for the sale. Many cities have a magic window in the spring when homes have a higher likelihood of selling quickly for more money.

Work with an agent from the start. The vast majority (90 percent) of sellers surveyed in the report who sold quickly and for more than list price worked with an agent, and two out of three (58 percent) began working with an agent at the very beginning of their selling journey.

Pay attention to your online curb appeal. The majority of buyers begin their search online. Sellers who sold their home for more than list price made imagery and home information available online: 48 percent had professional photos taken of the home; 30 percent shot video footage; and 21 percent shot drone footage. Zillow’s video walk-throughs give sellers an easy way to show home features that are hard to capture in photos.

Home improvements can be a worthwhile investment. Sellers who fetched above list price tackled home improvements before listing their home, being 50 percent more likely to take on a large project like modifying an existing home plan and 20 percent more likely to renovate a kitchen than the average seller.

Don’t be afraid to try again. In many markets, nearly half of listing views occur in the first week the home is on the market. Twenty-six percent of those who sold above list price took their home off the market once to adjust the sales price, opting to start anew, rather than letting the home languish on the market with minimal activity.

Reprinted with permission from RISMedia. ©2017. All rights reserved.