Monthly Archives: February 2017

Washington, DC Protected Classes

How well do you know your protected classes in the District of Columbia?

For real estate agents that have DC licenses but do not practice in the jurisdiction on a daily basis, it may seem daunting to keep up with and, in some cases you may be surprised at the traits on the list.

Under the D.C. Human Rights Act, discrimination in housing on the basis of the following traits is illegal:

  • Race
  • Colorgroup
  • Religion
  • National origin
  • Sex
  • Age
  • Marital status
  • Personal appearance
  • Sexual orientation
  • Gender identity or expression
  • Familial status
  • Family responsibilities
  • Matriculation
  • Political affiliation
  • Disability
  • Source of income
  • Status as a victim of an intrafamily offense
  • Place of residence or business

While I always say, “if you have to ask, don’t do it”, I can tell you the best practice is to be kind and inclusive to everyone. You should have learned that in kindergarten. 😉

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Study: Smart Home Tech Adoption Motivated by Comfort, Safety

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Comfort and safety are the primary reasons more homeowners are adopting smart home technology, according to a recent study by Scripps Networks Interactive in conjunction with the National Association of Home Builders (NAHB) and the National Kitchen and Bath Association (NKBA). “Keeping up” with the latest technology, the study shows, is less of a factor, with three-quarters of those surveyed saying they implement smart home technology “to keep their family safe and comfortable.” Energy-efficiency, as well, is another motivator, with the intention to boost resale value and reduce energy costs.

Millennials are the most likely to adopt smart home technology, according to the study, “to make their home convenient for daily tasks;” those in Generation X, conversely, prefer smart home technology as a means “to make their home a healthy environment.” Baby boomers, in addition, favor smart home technology “to add value to their home.” Eighty-five percent of millennials are likely to add smart home technology to their home, compared to 73 percent of those in Generation X and 67 percent of baby boomers.

The kitchen is the top spot for smart home technology, with those studied purchasing app-enabled, connected appliances, such as a smart refrigerator, motion-activated lighting and voice-activated speakers. Generation X respondents reported the kitchen as the top spot for smart home technology more than any other generation.

Fifteen percent of study respondents cite the front door as the most desired place for adding technology, while 13 percent cite the living room. Forty-four percent cite “energy monitoring” and “light automation” as their most desired tools; computer-controlled or mobile device-operated systems, a doorbell camera and surveillance equipment are also popular.

Smart home technology, according to a recent report by the National Association of REALTORS® (NAR), is becoming more concerning to homebuyers and sellers, who are most interested in privacy and security measures.

Source: Scripps Networks Interactive
Reprinted with permission from RISMedia. ©2017. All rights reserved.